Prevention

Our goal is to nurture happy, healthy pets.

Pharmacy

As your pet's veterinarian, we have a thorough understanding of their medical history, current needs, and temperament. To further serve our patients, we provide an in-house pet pharmacy which allows us to better monitor your pet's health when taking prescribed medications. Offering you and your pet the convenience of having an in-house pharmacy allows you to easily obtain your pet's prescription while you wait, after your office visit, or have it prepared for pick-up.
Some of the items available include:


  • Dental care products
  • Dietary supplements
  • Flea and tick medication
  • Heartworm preventatives
  • Medicated shampoos and conditioners
  • Most over-the-counter medications
  • Odor control and pet stain removal products
  • Prescription food and treats

The National Association of Boards of Pharmacy and FDA Compliance Policy Guideline 7132.09 state that our facility is not to allow patients to return unused prescriptions or over-the-counter products. Our office is held solely responsible in any instance of altered or contaminated prescription drugs harming any pet or pet owner. For this reason, we cannot accept any returns of opened items or any returned prescriptions. Also, any items that are beyond their expiration date are not acceptable for return. Please keep in mind that these policies are set in place to protect you and your pet from receiving potentially harmful substances.
If you have any questions about this policy or our pet pharmacy, please contact us at your convenience.

Deworming

Deworming your pet is an integral aspect of pet care. While nearly 85% of kittens and puppies are born with parasitic infections, most animals develop immunity over time. However, illness and stress can weaken the body's response to fight off these parasites and can awaken any dormant larvae living in your pet.
Intestinal parasites affect growth and development and can be transferred between pets and pet owners. If you think your pet might be suffering from a parasitic infection, we can perform fecal exams to detect microscopic parasite eggs and determine an infection.
Common internal parasites:


  • Coccidia
  • Giardia
  • Hookworms
  • Roundworms
  • Tapeworms
  • Whipworms

Different dewormers target different parasites - you cannot buy any medication and assume it will work. It is also important to administer the medication as prescribed. 
How to control parasites


Parasites are known for their ability to continually re-contaminate their host. In order to control parasites, destroying the eggs and larvae before re-infestation is critical. To achieve this, pet owners must maintain clean and dry living areas for their pets.
Pets should be kept in areas that are easy to remove waste from, wash out, and keep clean such as cement or gravel. Dirt and grass should be avoided when possible. Pet waste needs to be removed daily, and fleas need to be exterminated.

Vaccinations

While nursing, pets receive antibodies and nutrients from their mother's milk. When nursing stops, pets become more susceptible to illnesses because their immune systems do not have the same support they once did. As part of a preventative care routine, pet vaccinations can help protect your pet from life-threatening diseases.
For most pets, routine vaccinations start around the age of 6 to 8 weeks old and continue regularly throughout adulthood. Some vaccinations are even combined into a single syringe so a pet experiences fewer injections. After being vaccinated, most young pets take about 5 days to build protective antibodies with complete protection taking place after 14 days. Some vaccines require multiple dosages given over a short period of time, and most require booster shots every 6 months to 3 years. Pets who have been vaccinated have an advantage over those who have not. When a disease is detected, your vaccinated pet's immune system quickly responds, decreasing severity of the illness or preventing it altogether. While it is rare, some pets do not develop immunity from their vaccinations and still become ill. If your pet has been vaccinated, is current on all of their booster shots, and has never shown signs of illness or disease, it has likely been successfully vaccinated.
Pet owners should note that vaccinations are preventative, not curative. A vaccination will prevent an illness, but if your pet is already suffering from a disease, a vaccine will not cure them.
Core and non-core pet vaccinations
There are several pet vaccinations that are necessary for all pets and others that are recommended only under special circumstances. Core vaccinations are those that are commonly recommended for all pets, and non-core vaccinations include those that are only administered to pets considered to be ?at-risk.? Necessary vaccines depend on local regulations, geographic location, and your pet's lifestyle. Your pet will be vaccinated according to their risk of exposure and your veterinarian will discuss the best options for your pet.
Canine vaccinations
Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, Parvovirus (DHPP) - These vaccines are considered core vaccines. Your puppy will receive their first vaccination between 6 and 8 weeks old, and booster shots will be given until your puppy is 15 to 18 weeks old (depending on when vaccinations were started). A booster vaccination is administered after the first year and every 2 years following that.

Bordetella (kennel cough) - This is also a non-core vaccine, and your veterinarian might not consider your pet to be at risk depending on the dog's exposure.

Leptospirosis -
This non-core vaccine can be given to a puppy aged 6 months or older and is an annual vaccination that is intended to prevent bacterial infections in the kidneys, liver, and other major organs.  Lyme - The Lyme vaccination is a non-core vaccine that is first administered when the puppy reaches 12 weeks old. The booster is recommended annualy for dogs that reside in areas with increased exposure to ticks carrying Lyme disease.
Rabies - The rabies vaccine is considered a core vaccine. The initial vaccine is first given when the puppy reaches 16 weeks old. A booster shot is necessary after 1 year, then typically every 3rd year following that.
Feline vaccinations
Feline Herpesvirus, Calici Virus, Feline Distemper - These vaccines are considered core vaccines. Your kitten will receive their first vaccinations between the ages of 6 and 8 weeks, and they will need to be repeated until your kitten reaches 15 to 17 weeks old (depending on when vaccinations were started). A booster vaccination is administered annually then boosters are given every 2 years. Rabies - This vaccine is also a core vaccination for kittens. The initial vaccine is first administered between 12 and 16 weeks of age. A booster shot is necessary after 1 year, then typically every 3 years following that.

Preventable canine diseases and symptoms:

Adenovirus - a life-threatening disease that causes hepatitis.
Distemper - also a life-threatening disease that causes diarrhea, pneumonia, seizures, and vomiting.
Leptospirosis - a life-threatening disease that causes severe liver and kidney damage and hemorrhaging within the lungs. Symptoms include loss of appetite, yellowed eyes (jaundice), vomiting, lethargy, and urine that is dark brown in color.

Lyme - a disease transferred through ticks. It is most common in the northern hemisphere which is why the vaccination remains ?non-core?. Symptoms include circular skin rashes, depression, fatigue, fever, and headaches. Lyme disease can be treated with antibiotics if it is caught in earlier stages.
Parainfluenza and Bordetella - both are illnesses that are highly contagious and cause kennel cough. While it is generally not life-threatening, symptoms include a non-stop runny nose and excessive coughing.
Parvovirus - a potentially life-threatening disease that results in diarrhea, vomiting, and deterioration of the white blood cells.
Rabies - a fatal disease attacking the central nervous system. Because there isn't a cure for rabies, animals that contract the disease are euthanized. The greatest risk of keeping the pet alive is that the disease can be spread to humans.
Preventable feline diseases and symptoms:

Feline Leukemia Virus - a potentially life threatening virus that causes chronic immune suppression, leading to frequent infection and illness. It often results in cancer.
Herpesvirus and Calicivirus - highly contagious illnesses that cause fever, malaise, runny nose, and watery eyes.
Panleukopenia (also known as Feline Distemper) - a life threatening disease that causes pets to suffer dehydration, diarrhea, low white blood cell count, and vomiting.
Rabies - a fatal disease attacking the central nervous system. Because there isn't a cure for rabies, animals that contract the disease are euthanized. The greatest risk of keeping the pet alive is that the disease can be spread to humans.
Pet vaccination concerns
Similar to human vaccinations, pet vaccinations do carry a risk of side-effects. While negative side-effects do exist, it is important to note that your pet is statistically more likely to develop a life-threatening illness when not vaccinated, than to suffer adverse results from a vaccination. None-the-less, it is important to remain informed so you can ask your veterinarian the appropriate questions at your pet's appointment.
After being vaccinated, the injection site can be swollen or sore. Some pets also have a reduced appetite, fever, and experience lethargy. These side-effects should diminish over the next 24 to 48 hours. If you notice your pet's side-effects are not subsiding, please contact our office. Very rarely, pets develop an allergy to a vaccine. Allergies can be detected within minutes of receiving a vaccination and if left untreated, can result in death. If you witness any of the following, contact our office immediately: collapse, non-stop diarrhea, continual vomiting, difficulty breathing, itching, or swelling of the legs or face.
If you have any questions about vaccinations or scheduling new pet vaccinations, you may contact our office at your convenience.